Ho Ki Mok

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Ho Ki Mok

Originally from Hong Kong, Ho Ki is now a Brooklyn resident. It wasn't always easy for her. She came out in high school as a lesbian, but she's still not out to her mother. She is learning a lot about what it means to be a member of the LGBTQ community at her job, the Department of Health, but at home, she says, "It's just not a part of our culture. We just don't talk about it."

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John Vasquez

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John Vasquez

“At that time, we just didn't worry about anything. It was just living life and having a nice time. It was different then.... I was in an underground club, in the basement of this building... The door opened up, and there was this fabulous club with a sunken bar, and a dance floor. It was wonderful. But unfortunately, the fun didn't last that long because the place was raided by the cops that night.”

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Sarina Bello

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Sarina Bello

Sarina left Jonathan in the past, but she will not forget to acknowledge him. Now, however, she is happy living in her truth. At 16, she started telling everyone. Watch her story, and then add your own voice to VideoOut's library of coming out stories. Be a part of something powerful!

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Barbara Abrams

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Barbara Abrams

Barbara moved to NYC is 1969, just in time for the disco era. Her experiences excited her and allowed her to live her truth. She recounts her losses - an all to common narrative surrounding the AIDS epidemic - but, her story ends on a happy note: she is happy being Barbara the lesbian.

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Nathan Ratapu

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Nathan Ratapu

"My coming-out story is definitely one where my mom figured me out first, and then I had to come to terms with where I was."

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Katy Chatel

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Katy Chatel

Katy is a queer, single mom by choice. She knows the anxiety harboring a secret brings, and the freedom that comes from shinning a light on it. Her hope is that by sharing her story, she'll let others know it's ok to be queer and a parent.

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DaVida Cole

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DaVida Cole

Don't compare yourself to people who've come out at different ages. Just let it happen. It's your life..."

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Jeffrey Marsh

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Jeffrey Marsh

“I wanted to say that my gender identity was Wonder Woman and that I was deeply in love with Scott Bacula.”

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Steven Lowe

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Steven Lowe

“When I got to that point, life just felt so much better for me. It was a lot lighter in a real way."

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Michael David Reyes

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Michael David Reyes

Michael, also known as Barbie, has always lived life between Mexico and The United States. Crossing the border was a regular experience for he and his friends throughout high school, often staying out very late to hang out. After one of those night, Michael's father asked him a question.

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Cliff Simon

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Cliff Simon

"It all started when I came out. And not just because of the gay stuff. It was a waterfall of everything."

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Estelle Bloise

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Estelle Bloise

Estelle has a great sense of humor - but she feels funniest, and most in tune with herself, when she is not in her "normal boy clothes." Being herself is new to Estelle, but she's already on a fantastic journey of authenticity, and she's not looking back. One of the main reasons, she claims, is that she found an incredible group of people to support her along the way!

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Will Berger

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Will Berger

Even then I wasn't clear this is who I was, but it was... To simply summarize it, 'You are a gay man' - that took much longer. And it's still going on today!

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Becki Pine

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Becki Pine

Probably I was about 12 years old when I said it out loud, but I never really thought about it, but I remember telling my mom, ‘I’m not gonna just date men. I’m have no interest in gender. It’s more about the connection I have with the person.’ I don’t really think she reacted to it. She was just like, ‘Okay!’

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Yuhua Hamasaki

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Yuhua Hamasaki

Yuhua Hamasaki knows that to get through life, you have to love yourself. It took her a long time to learn some really important lessons, but her best advice is that your happiness should always come first.

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Lisa Cannistraci

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Lisa Cannistraci

The person that really made the most impact on me - I worked Monday nights - and my bouncer was Stormé DeLarverie...She was 65 when I met her and she was the bouncer at Cubby Hole. You know, Monday nights would be really quiet, but we had to stay open until 4 am. I would study my psychology books from 1 am to 3 am, and then Stormé would share stories about her life

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Justin Bray

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Justin Bray

Accepting it for myself was the struggle. We’ve always been Christian - gone to church - and just not really being super educated about what being a gay Christian means - just going off what other people thought and misconceptions and stuff like that - is really what I’ve based my beliefs on. My struggles - it all really came from that. I had a hard time accepting - just admitting to myself that I was gay.

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Grace Balzar

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Grace Balzar

Grace is the epitome of her name. She experienced abuse from her biological parents, lived in the foster care system, transitioned in a time of what seemed like politically sanctioned prejudice, and has the best attitude about life you could possibly imagine.

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